slow down with Yin Yoga

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You cannot always change the outside,
but you can always change the inside
Wayne Dyer

Both Kundalini Yoga end Yin Yoga enhance and restore energy in our body and its magnetic field. In Yin Yoga we place the body in particular postures to both pull and pressurize tissues and fascia.  This is based on the science of meridian theory, which suggests that there is an energy flow through our body running through invisible pathways called meridians or nadi's. This is our life force, our primordial energy, 'Chi', 'Qi' or 'Prana'. 

 

Taoist yogis suggest that this energy splits into two complementary polarities, yin and yang. These exist throughout the Universe and in our life and body. These energies come from the same source but reflect different qualities of energy, female & masculine, the sun and the moon, water and fire. Our organs can be described as either yin or yang. Based on this wisdom connected to the five elements in nature: fire, water, earth, wood and metal, we can heal our body and balance its energy.

Yin Practice is a more passive form of yoga stimulating this flow of 'Chi' into the energy channels, tissues and organs. This web of tissues (fascia) is spread throughout the whole of our body, our muscles, bones and organs. Poses are done in a relaxed way, with not too much engaging of the muscles, depending on the amount of sensation appropriate for our spine and body. Poses are held for +- 5 minutes. This allows the body to melt slowly into the pose while being connected to slow deep breathing to allow restoring the energy flow and emotional balance.

 

 I like this relaxed form of yoga in the evening at the end of the day. But in the beginning of the day our tissues are still stiff. The effect of pulling and pressurizing is more enhanced which is a good boost for a good start of the day.

Listen to your body's signal, what does it need at a certain moment? More of a yin practice or more yang elements.

Inspired from the book'Insight Yoga', Sarah Powers.